» Fit to a T Volleyball

Thank you for your subscription to “Fit to a T” the Ultimate Conditioning Experience and the 7-T program design quick starter kit.  Here’s how it works.

 

 

T-1 Training Age/History

This T is to avoid doing too much or the wrong thing.  All too often advanced programs are prescribed to young, developing athletes.   All information present is assigned a training age beginning, intermediate and advanced. Training age is defined as: beginning-level athletes with training age of 0 to 2 years, intermediate-level athletes with training age of 2 to 4 years, advance-level athletes with training age of over 4 years. Training age year is continuous year-round conditioning beyond just playing baseball-softball.

Training history is the summary of training age experience.  If your athletes have trained on their own or with another coach it’s important to learn what they have done.  This will allow you to establish training age, habits, needs etc. Also history should include injuries and the response to rehabilitation.

 

T-2 Time

Time has two factors:

A. Time of year

B. Time available on a daily basis.

Start with a calendar and mark your off-season, pre-season, in-seasons.  This calendar is unique to your program.  Next fill in your Competitions/Practices/Conditioning/Recovery schedule for each season/week/day.  Be sure to include and how much time you can devote to conditioning.  If conditioning is part of practice be sure to put this in. Don’t forget recovery days!

 

T-3 Tools

The type of equipment you have to condition with is unique.  It will determine if you use a weight room, the diamond or a combination of the two.

 

T-4 Teaching

The exercises you select must be taught using perfect technique whether you teach it or have outside assistance.

 

T-5 Testing

Find out where your athletes are at and what they need to develop.

 

T-6 Total Workload

Determine your Total Workload to insure your athletes develop in a progressive fashion with adequate recovery by controlling practice/competition work with conditioning work.  This is a challenge because of the busy life athletes lead today.   The ultimate responsibility of the strength and conditioning program must be that of the baseball-softball coach.   This is done by establishing your calendar (T-2) that identifies and integrates total work load based on competition, practice and strength and conditioning training.   Competition should include scholastic and club play.  Practice should consider strength and/or conditioning activities done on diamond including warm-up and throwing etc.  Strength and conditioning should include training with the school’s/club’s strength and conditioning coach and other training outside the baseball-softball coach’s control such as at a private gym.   In the case of a multi-sport athlete the baseball-softball coach should have the additional task of communicating with other sport coach(s) as to the progress of the athlete.  The final outcome is to provide adequate recovery based on total workload to allow the athlete to progress physically, improve baseball-softball skills and reach their full athletic potential through this seamless integration process.

 

T-7 Team Position

This T is for programs that are more advanced.  The training needs of a catcher are different than the pitcher.  The basic strength/power program is basically the same for all positions but variance occurs in movement patterns and the conditioning demands.  This requires more specific training.  This is a coaching choice based on the other 6-Ts.

 

 

Start off with the Fit to a T Quick Starter Kit that features several articles key to laying the groundwork in each of the 7 T’s! Then every Friday check out the site to get the newest article to add to your library.